Black Money (Full Version)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Have Your Say! Rate This Film!
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

In Black Money, Frontline correspondent Lowell Bergman investigates this shadowy side of international business, shedding light on multinational companies that have routinely made secret payments — often referred to as “black money” — to win billions in business. “The thing about black money is you can claim it’s being used for all kinds of things,” the British reporter David Leigh tells Bergman. “You get pots of black money that nobody sees, nobody has to account for, … you can do anything you like with. Mostly what happens with black money is people steal it because they can.”

Leigh knows. In his groundbreaking reporting for The Guardian newspaper, he helped uncover one of the biggest and most complicated cases currently under investigation — a story involving a British aerospace giant, the Saudi royal family, and an $80 billion international arms deal known as Al Yamamah, or “The Dove” in Arabic. “If there was one person who was the main man behind this arms deal, it turned out it was the U.S. ambassador, Prince Bandar bin Sultan,” says Leigh.

It all started back in 1985, when the charismatic Prince Bandar was put in charge of acquiring new fighter jets for the Saudi Arabian air force. The Israeli lobby in Congress reportedly stood in the way of the United States making a deal with the Saudis, so President Ronald Reagan sent Bandar to the British. The prince approached a willing Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, and they sealed the massive deal between the United Kingdom, BAE Systems (formerly British Aerospace) and the Royal Saudi Air Force.

Rumors swirled that billions in bribes had changed hands to secure the deal, but British officials denied wrongdoing. “Of course there is suspicion, and of course people are entitled to be suspicious,” says Lord Timothy Bell, who was involved in the deal from the beginning on behalf of the Thatcher government. “But as far as I’m concerned, if the British government … and the Saudi government reached a sovereign agreement over an arms contract that resulted in a tremendous number of jobs in Britain, a great deal of wealth creation in Britain, … and enabled Saudi Arabians to defend themselves, … I think that’s a jolly good contract.”

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Have Your Say! Rate This Film!
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
Rise Like Lions - Occupy Wall Street and the Seeds of Revolution, 3.7 out of 5 based on 7 ratings
< |||| > 1 2 3 4 5

Rise Like Lions – Occupy Wall Street and the Seeds of Revolution

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Have Your Say! Rate This Film!
Rating: 3.7/5 (7 votes cast)

Rise Like Lions takes the people, actions, and words from the camps and streets of Occupy Wall Street and provides a radical, compelling and inspiring account of what the movement is about.
 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Have Your Say! Rate This Film!
Rating: 3.7/5 (7 votes cast)
Rise Like Lions - Occupy Wall Street and the Seeds of Revolution, 3.7 out of 5 based on 7 ratings
Report Broken Video Link

1 comment to Rise Like Lions – Occupy Wall Street and the Seeds of Revolution

  • andre

    As documentaries go, this presents a pretty accurate portrayal of what was going on, AT THE TIME, why the movement came into being, the inspiration we felt, etc. (I was there).
    But that was two years ago; and the film could have been far more valuable if it included some discussion of why it fell apart; that is, besides the police brutality.
    And yes, it showed some of the brutality, but the significance of the brutal shutdown was not explored: the state could not tolerate even the essence of the OCCUPY tactic: peacefully taking a tiny portion of public space in order to have a new discussion, (a radical tactic, precisely because it’s non-violent).
    But by that time, most of the general public had lost interest in the movement because, (in general) the encampments had failed to reach out beyond their borders with some clear demands.
    And there were reasons for this.
    The general assemblies, the human mic, etc. were rather brilliant responses to hierarchic power; but they also had serious problems that needed to be overcome.
    Without clear leadership/focus, the inspiration that so many initially felt began to dissipate; and then the hangers-on, the battered and broken folk who weren’t prepared to do the work began to drag the rest of us down.

    One could go on talking ’bout it for hours, of course; but sadly, it’s no longer relevant; and I think the film represents a tendency on ‘the left’ these days, (hate to use left/right terms, but there’s no question as to the movements general character): instead of openly (and constructively) talking about the weaknesses, the left today tends to fall back on its points of inspiration, (to keep ourselves going); when, this is actually an expression of weakness, insecurity, and gets us nowhere.

    OCCUPY, as a tactic, is not dead, (witness Egypt in 2013, Turkey etc); and it will rise again in America, (activists are still doing stuff on a smaller scale); but unless we take the time to have an open, honest discussion about the challenges facing our ORGANIZED RESISTANCE, then we will not be prepared to take the revo to the next level, when once again, deteriorating circumstances drives a mass movement into the streets.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

What Did You Think? Leave a Reply

Republic Broadcasting Live Stream